Worm Composting!

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Chris Trapp
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Joined: Tue Jan 10, 2006 11:46 am
Location: Lakewood
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Worm Composting!

Postby Chris Trapp » Wed Apr 04, 2007 10:26 pm

I'm about to order some red wiggler worms for vermicomposting. I thought I would see if anyone else wanted to place an order with me. By buying as a group we can save on the price per pound and shipping costs. Depending on how many are ordered, the cost will likely be $20-25/pound plus shipping.

If you have any questions about vermicomposting, feel free to email me and I will share what I know. Once we receive the worms, we will gather to discuss the basics of a worm box. Basically, you have a box with shredded newspaper or leaves, worms, some moisture, and vegetable scraps. The worms eat the food, and leave their castings. You can then use the castings as an organic amendment for your garden. The worms will multiply and enable you to expand your capacity over time. You need one pound of worms for every one-half pound of daily food scraps you produce.

In the future, the LEAF Community will be having some workshops on making and tending compost bins, vermicomposting bins, and rain water barrels. For now, if you want to dive in with some worms, let me know. I will be ordering Sunday April 8th.

Chris Trapp
trapp_christopher@yahoo.com

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Mission:
Lakewood Earth And Food Community is dedicated to the development of a more sustainable, healthful and economically viable community through actions producing broad access to the purchasing, growing and trading of fresh, local foods and culture.


john crino
Posts: 126
Joined: Wed May 18, 2005 4:26 pm

wormz

Postby john crino » Sun Apr 08, 2007 8:17 am

damn...i just ordered my worms last week...sorry chris
maybe next worm ordering season
love,john


Chris Trapp
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Joined: Tue Jan 10, 2006 11:46 am
Location: Lakewood
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Postby Chris Trapp » Tue Apr 10, 2007 11:40 am

John,
I've seen the worms you ordered. They're second rate. When you want some quality wigglers let me know.
Is it true that you're eliminating the kids' play area at b.d. and turning it into a giant worm composting bin? You're out of control.
Chris


David Anderson
Posts: 375
Joined: Mon Jun 05, 2006 12:41 pm

Postby David Anderson » Tue Apr 10, 2007 12:07 pm

Chris -

I would love to do this but can't get my wife comfortable with the notion of bringing the worms in for the winter months. Are you building a structure where you won't have to move your little buddies indoors when it gets below 40 degrees?

Thanks


Chris Trapp
Posts: 71
Joined: Tue Jan 10, 2006 11:46 am
Location: Lakewood
Contact:

Postby Chris Trapp » Tue Apr 10, 2007 12:14 pm

David,
I don't yet have a year-round outdoor solution. I am trying to figure out how to make that possible.
I did on the other hand finally convince my wife that the worms would be okay in the basement over the winter. I should probably hedge my bets in case that experiment fails and find another winter option. Perhaps this is a business opportunity...winter wormbin hosting.


David Anderson
Posts: 375
Joined: Mon Jun 05, 2006 12:41 pm

Postby David Anderson » Tue Apr 10, 2007 12:40 pm

The winter issue is tough.

From what I've read, it takes about 3-months before you can harvest the first soil. So, absent a cooperative mate willing to share the laundry area with a box of red wigglers or a heated attached garage, much work will be put in to gaining two harvests. Fun, yes, but it would be a bit hard on the worms from mid-October to May.

I'm assuming the worms in my garden right now are not red. I turned the soil a couple of weeks back and disturbed many. How could these survive the winter if they were red? Any ideas?


john crino
Posts: 126
Joined: Wed May 18, 2005 4:26 pm

Postby john crino » Tue Apr 10, 2007 2:34 pm

Chris Trapp wrote:John,
I've seen the worms you ordered. They're second rate. When you want some quality wigglers let me know.
Is it true that you're eliminating the kids' play area at b.d. and turning it into a giant worm composting bin? You're out of control.
Chris

a giant worm composting bin sounds better than the giant pit of plastic balls...kids pee in those things accoding to my mom.....


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Jim O'Bryan
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Postby Jim O'Bryan » Wed Apr 11, 2007 6:02 am

john crino wrote:a giant worm composting bin sounds better than the giant pit of plastic balls...kids pee in those things accoding to my mom.....


John

How does that help? Do the worms need the pee to compost better? Is this like the guy on WVIZ with natural cures. Who claims pee poured around the house keeps ants out?

.


Jim O'Bryan
Lakewood Resident

"The very act of observing disturbs the system."
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If not, don't worry. Just forget about it."
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