Tarifflation!

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stephen davis
Posts: 597
Joined: Sat Mar 26, 2005 9:49 pm
Location: lakewood, ohio

Tarifflation!

Postby stephen davis » Wed Aug 22, 2018 2:15 pm

Yesterday, I heard about some incredible price hikes, resulting from tariffs, placed on products and materials we use at our company. Scary what the impact may be.

Inflation is back in a bigger way than we have seen in many years. The Trump-appointed Fed chairman has been somewhat reluctant to slow the economy by raising interest rates, as Greenspan and other predecessors did when the economy ran too hot. He knows better, but every time he mentions a hike in interest rates, Trump tweets his disapproval. Trump apparently wants the economy running extra hot through the mid-term elections.

I fear that Inflation combined with tariff-specific price inflation as an accelerant will have a negative effect on the quality of life for many Americans.

I was inspired to invent a new word.

TARIFFLATION

You read it here first.


stephen davis


.


Nothin' shakin' on Shakedown Street.
Used to be the heart of town.
Don't tell me this town ain't got no heart.
You just gotta poke around.

Robert Hunter/Sometimes attributed to Ezra Pound.
ryan costa
Posts: 1963
Joined: Fri Jan 06, 2006 10:31 pm

Re: Tarifflation!

Postby ryan costa » Sun Sep 23, 2018 5:40 pm

It is easier to get into the trade deals than out of them. America initiated them. That changed a lot of the domestic equilibriums. So will reneging on the free trade deals.
Our Constitution gives Congress the powers to make whatever our tax, trade, and currency policies are.
Most voters generally don't pay attention to most of what Congress does. If you tell them someone is going to take away their guns or put some lowest class urban dwellers on the tv you can talk them into anything else.
American retailers and big companies have been racing each other to outsource manufacturing for over 30 years at an unprecedented rate. Most voters voted to lower the taxes of the entities that made the most money outsourcing.
Most voters generally don't pay attention to most of what Congress does, or what our laws even are. If you tell many voters someone is going to take away their guns, or put some lowest class urban dwellers on the tv you can talk many voters into anything else. Another good tactic is to get them worked up about people they do not like wearing condoms or having abortions.
Congress is boring. Watching sports on television is more important. Watching programs of people talking about sports is also more important.


"assume we have a can opener" - Ravi Batra

"Good luck with what you're doin'".--Ramses Luther Smuckles.
stephen davis
Posts: 597
Joined: Sat Mar 26, 2005 9:49 pm
Location: lakewood, ohio

Re: Tarifflation!

Postby stephen davis » Tue Oct 02, 2018 11:06 pm

james fitzgibbons wrote:I will contact Websters Dictionary. It is a good one Steve.


Jim,

A word does not get into the dictionary just because it may seem to be a good one.

In the 1980s, I had a conversation with a writer at CSU about a word I wanted to use in some ad copy. It was "warranteed". I wanted to use it as a verb form of warranty. She understood my intent, but questioned the legitimacy of the word, especially as a verb. Her husband was an editor for Webster's New World Dictionary. I asked her to ask her husband about it. In a follow-up conversation, she told me that her husband said there is no such word. Both of them had heard warranteed used, but considered it to be incorrect. Even though there is the temptation to use warranty in the same way you might use guarantee, you shouldn't. Guarantee can be a noun, or a verb. A common verb tense of guarantee is guaranteed. The verb for warranty is warrant. You warrant a product. A product may be warranted, but not warranteed. You do not warrantee. A warrantee is a person on the receiving end of a warranty.

I learned that a word, or word form, may exist in limited usage, but not enter the dictionary until it is proven to be in a lot more common usage, especially in published usage. Warranteed could become a word. There is evidence online that warrantied" is sometimes used, but still not widely recognized.

My word, "tarifflation", is an invention by me that was published here on this page. It is not in common usage or published elsewhere. I think tarifflation, is a silly way to describe a problem that will probably rear its ugly head relative to a raise in consumer pricing caused by tariffs as time goes by, but it would have to be spoken and published by many to ever gain inclusion in a dictionary.

So, if tarifflation ever ends up on the news, or in a dictionary, you read it here first.


Steve

.


Nothin' shakin' on Shakedown Street.
Used to be the heart of town.
Don't tell me this town ain't got no heart.
You just gotta poke around.

Robert Hunter/Sometimes attributed to Ezra Pound.
ryan costa
Posts: 1963
Joined: Fri Jan 06, 2006 10:31 pm

Re: Tarifflation!

Postby ryan costa » Thu Oct 04, 2018 5:31 am

The word is 'Reaganomics'. The Trump tax cuts are a severe reiteration of Reaganomics. De-industrialization and annual deficits accelerated following the introduction of Reaganomics. Household savings rates crashed. What will happen this time, Charlie Brown?


"assume we have a can opener" - Ravi Batra

"Good luck with what you're doin'".--Ramses Luther Smuckles.
Tim Liston
Posts: 678
Joined: Sun Aug 07, 2005 3:10 pm

Re: Tarifflation!

Postby Tim Liston » Fri May 24, 2019 1:21 pm

The Federal Reserve has just estimated that our tariffs on goods from China (at 25% on $200 billion in goods) will cost the average American household $831 per year.

(click here)

I wonder if (1) they're factoring in what we might recoup if production and jobs were repatriated, or (2) if some of what we get from China can be sourced from other countries? My daughter works in manufacturing, her plant is already sourcing some of what they got from China, to Mexico. It costs a bit more but the lead times are shorter. She's OK with that.

Plus to the extent that the mainstream media has been squealing about the consumer cost of China tariffs, one can only conclude that tariffs are probably a good thing. And I can assure you that the Federal Reserve is costing my household WAY more than $831 a year.

If all it costs my household is $831 a year to bring back some jobs and to stop US firms from arbitraging lax labor and (especially) environmental regulations in China, I'm OK with that. Did you read that it appears that Chinese firms have abandoned the CFC ban so that they can manufacture the foam needed for some of their export items more cheaply?


ryan costa
Posts: 1963
Joined: Fri Jan 06, 2006 10:31 pm

Re: Tarifflation!

Postby ryan costa » Wed May 29, 2019 6:54 am

The United States initiated all of these free trade treaties.
It is easier to get into them than out of them.


"assume we have a can opener" - Ravi Batra

"Good luck with what you're doin'".--Ramses Luther Smuckles.

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