The Crocker Extension As A Lesson In Hypocrisy

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Bill Call
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The Crocker Extension As A Lesson In Hypocrisy

Postby Bill Call » Fri Dec 19, 2008 7:46 am

The Federal Government and Cuyahoga County have just spent $13 million (aka our own money) to create 1.6 miles of new road in Westlake:


http://www.north-olmsted.com/County%20N ... tearns.pdf

This type of project illustrates the main problem faced by cities like Lakewood: Federal, State and County governments are willing to spend whatever it takes to expand development in the exurbs. At the same time they are unwilling to spend even a fraction of that money in existing suburbs with substantially higher populations. We are caught between the hammer and the anvil.

The City of Lakewood had to fight hard to get even get a fraction of that amount for much needed repairs for Bunts road.

http://blog.cleveland.com/lakewoodsunpo ... illio.html

If NOACA spent the same amount per mile to improve Clifton and Detroit they would have to invest $130 million. That will never happen but it gives some perspective to the competitive disadvantage faced by Lakewood. This disadvantage is not caused by what the City is or what the leadership does or who the citizens are. It is created by our own higher levels of government.

The Crocker expansion is a lesson in hypocrisy because it gives lie to the claim that energy shortages will lead to a renewal the cities. Federal and State governments will spend whatever it takes to subsidize the exurbs. And in an era of trillion dollar budet deficits that will have all the money they need.


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Jim O'Bryan
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Re: The Crocker Extension As A Lesson In Hypocrisy

Postby Jim O'Bryan » Fri Dec 19, 2008 8:40 am

Bill

Are you sure?

I have spent the last two years speaking to and with foundations, colleges, universities, civic groups, politicians, and others, it would seem that there is billions available to "retrain, develop, redevelop, educate, open, green, save, not save, etc. urban areas."

But are the powers to be ready to play the game?

There is no money for malls, no money for retail.

.


Jim O'Bryan
Lakewood Resident

"The very act of observing disturbs the system."
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ryan costa
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Joined: Fri Jan 06, 2006 10:31 pm

nice

Postby ryan costa » Fri Dec 19, 2008 9:33 am

there are national level and multi-national level retailers, mall/office park developers, and other corporations in westlake-north olmsted. They can employ better specialists with better connections to help grease the wheels for this particular project and projects all over the state or nation. there are great economies of scale in lobbying and in steering policy.

Bunts is basically a residential street with a high school and a connection to some highways. there may be several convenience stores are bars.


"shall we have peace" - Henry Charles Carey

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