Residency Requirement

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Tim Liston
Posts: 725
Joined: Sun Aug 07, 2005 3:10 pm

Residency Requirement

Postby Tim Liston » Wed Sep 24, 2008 9:31 pm

Long time since a post on this forum so I thought I would put this up. I'm sure some buns will be frosted....

Click here

It seems that Cleveland lawyers were a day late in their support of residency requirements for city employees. I do believe that cities should have the right to require city employees to live within city limits.

I presume that Cleveland and its lawyers support residency, you would think with how much money these city lawyers get paid that deadlines would not be an issue....

Oh well....


Will Brown
Posts: 496
Joined: Sat Nov 10, 2007 10:56 am
Location: Lakewood

Postby Will Brown » Thu Sep 25, 2008 8:36 pm

Perhaps Cleveland limits its hiring to residents. I think I'd rather my city hire lawyers who can meet a filing deadline, than lawyers who happen to live here. I keep thinking of those small southern towns where all their employees belong to one inbred family.


Bill Call
Posts: 3215
Joined: Mon Jun 06, 2005 1:10 pm

Re: Residency Requirement

Postby Bill Call » Fri Sep 26, 2008 8:52 am

Tim Liston wrote:It seems that Cleveland lawyers were a day late in their support of residency requirements for city employees. I do believe that cities should have the right to require city employees to live within city limits.


There seems to be a rising level of incompetency in government and business.

The Panama Canal was built on time and on budget using steam shovels and wheel barrows but a new high school costs $350 million:

http://news.aol.com/article/350-million ... ens/159733

A couple of years ago I went to see the Hoover Dam. The most interesting part of the story came at the end. That's when they explained that the dam was completed on schedule and under budget. 80 years later the visitors center took longer to complete than the original dam, was substantially over budget and was completed way behind schedule.


David Anderson
Posts: 375
Joined: Mon Jun 05, 2006 12:41 pm

Postby David Anderson » Wed Oct 01, 2008 7:31 am

Bill -

96 people died during the construction of the Hoover (Boulder) Dam.


Jennifer Pae
Posts: 47
Joined: Mon Aug 07, 2006 7:53 am

Postby Jennifer Pae » Fri Oct 03, 2008 1:13 pm

Here is an update of what is going on in the Courts that I came across this week in the e-Newsletter from the law firm of Downes, Hurst & Fishel:

STATUS OF RESIDENCY STATUTE

Ohio Revised Code §9.481 was enacted by the Ohio General Assembly and took effect on May 1, 2006. The statute specifically prohibits any political subdivision from requiring its employees to reside in any area of the state. The only exception is that those employees who are required to respond in the event of an emergency or disaster may be required to reside within the county in which the political subdivision is located or in any adjacent county.

Five cities challenged the residency statute as violating the home rule section of the Ohio Constitution. In City of Lima v. State of
Ohio, unreported, 2007 WL 4248278 (3rd Dist. Ct. App. 12/3/07), the Court of Appeals found the statute unconstitutional
because it violated the municipal home rule section of the Ohio Constitution. The Ohio Supreme Court accepted the case for
review on May 7, 2008.

In State of Ohio v. City of Akron, et al., 2008 WL 81506 (9th Dist. Ct. App. 1/9/08) both the City and its unions filed a motion for declaratory judgement regarding the residency requirement in Akron’s charter. The Summit County Common Pleas Court ruled against the City, but the 9th District Ct. of Appeals ruled in its favor, finding that the statute violated the municipal home rule provision of the state constitution. The State appealed and oral arguments before the Ohio Supreme Court will be scheduled on the same day as those in the Lima case.

In City of Dayton v. State of Ohio, unreported, 2008 WL 2222706 (2nd Dist. Ct. App. 5/30/08) the Court of Appeals found the statute to be constitutional. The Dayton case has been accepted for review by the Ohio Supreme Court but has been stayed pending outcome of the Lima and Akron cases.

In both City of Cleveland v. State of Ohio, unreported, 2008 WL 2252542 (8th Dist. Ct. App. June 2, 2008) and City of Toledo and City of Oregon v. State of Ohio, unreported 2008 WL 1837256 (6th Dist. Ct. App. April 25, 2008) the Courts of Appeals found the statute to be in violation of the home rule provision of the Ohio Constitution. Both cases have been accepted for review, but, like the Dayton case ,have been stayed pending the outcome of the other two cases.

Of the five (5) cases challenging the statute, only one Court of Appeals has found the statute to be constitutional. Downes, Hurst & Fishel is filing an amicus curiae (friend of the court) brief on behalf of the Ohio Public Employer Labor Relations Association in support of the cities’ position in these cases.

A Periodic Publication of Downes, Hurst & Fishel


ryan costa
Posts: 2076
Joined: Fri Jan 06, 2006 10:31 pm

hoover

Postby ryan costa » Mon Oct 06, 2008 4:57 am

Henry Kaiser was one of the chief contractors on the hoover dam. He didn't have a degree in engineering or an MBA.

tens of thousands of high schools have been built. it should be easy enough to apply the designs of old high schools to new spaces. but the trend these days is to build them like one story prisons or shopping malls.

It takes more sophistication today to build less sturdy less affordable buildings and infrastructure.

it makes sense for most city workers to live in the city: they are more likely to have insight into how to get the right departments involved when something goes wrong. They are paid by tax dollars, so should have a greater interest in the quality of life issues in the city.


"shall we have peace" - Henry Charles Carey
Bill Call
Posts: 3215
Joined: Mon Jun 06, 2005 1:10 pm

Re: hoover

Postby Bill Call » Mon Oct 06, 2008 6:04 am

ryan costa wrote:tens of thousands of high schools have been built. it should be easy enough to apply the designs of old high schools to new spaces. but the trend these days is to build them like one story prisons or shopping malls.


The new high school in Los Angeles was ten years behind schedule and cost $350 million dollars to build.

It will serve as many students as Lakewood High.

http://www.wtopnews.com/?nid=104&sid=1471781


ryan costa
Posts: 2076
Joined: Fri Jan 06, 2006 10:31 pm

Re: hoover

Postby ryan costa » Mon Oct 06, 2008 7:27 pm

Bill Call wrote:
ryan costa wrote:tens of thousands of high schools have been built. it should be easy enough to apply the designs of old high schools to new spaces. but the trend these days is to build them like one story prisons or shopping malls.


The new high school in Los Angeles was ten years behind schedule and cost $350 million dollars to build.

It will serve as many students as Lakewood High.

http://www.wtopnews.com/?nid=104&sid=1471781


It is sad it takes 350 million to build a high school in Los Angeles.

http://ech.cwru.edu/ech-cgi/article.pl?id=BFS

about 100 years ago Cleveland did not have to look far for an architect and construction supervisor. They appointed Frank Seymour Barnum Architect and Superintendent of Buildings in the Cleveland Public School District. Frank Seymour Banum designed and supervised the construction of 75 Cleveland public schools. They were solid buildings. I'd like to see what was on his resume before he was hired for this job.


"shall we have peace" - Henry Charles Carey
Stephen Eisel
Posts: 3281
Joined: Fri Jan 26, 2007 9:36 pm

Postby Stephen Eisel » Mon Oct 06, 2008 8:03 pm

LOS ANGELES (AP) - A decade behind schedule, a $350 million downtown high school finally opened on Wednesday after years of environmental, seismic and legal troubles.


ryan costa
Posts: 2076
Joined: Fri Jan 06, 2006 10:31 pm

Postby ryan costa » Thu Oct 09, 2008 4:21 pm

Stephen Eisel wrote:
LOS ANGELES (AP) - A decade behind schedule, a $350 million downtown high school finally opened on Wednesday after years of environmental, seismic and legal troubles.

Has Los Angeles always been this unsuccessful at buildin high schools?

What about San Francisco? How well did they get high schools built within living memory of the big Earthquake?


"shall we have peace" - Henry Charles Carey
Stephen Eisel
Posts: 3281
Joined: Fri Jan 26, 2007 9:36 pm

Postby Stephen Eisel » Thu Oct 09, 2008 7:06 pm

ryan costa wrote:
Stephen Eisel wrote:
LOS ANGELES (AP) - A decade behind schedule, a $350 million downtown high school finally opened on Wednesday after years of environmental, seismic and legal troubles.

Has Los Angeles always been this unsuccessful at buildin high schools?

What about San Francisco? How well did they get high schools built within living memory of the big Earthquake?
That is like building the Brown's stadium.....



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