Star Chamber For The Arts - Your Tax Dollars At Work

Forum strictly about development, urban planning, community programs ideas, and discussions about cities around the world and what they are doing right.

Moderator: Jim DeVito

Brian Pedaci
Posts: 496
Joined: Wed Nov 08, 2006 1:17 am

Postby Brian Pedaci » Fri Aug 15, 2008 9:46 pm

Jim,

I don't think a single person would argue with you that children benefit greatly from a broad exposure to arts and an education in appreciation. That helps create the demand that artists will fill for our children throughout their lives. Expanding educational programs is a major pillar of the CAC's mission statement.

They don't have the ability (authority or infrastructure) to create those educational programs from whole cloth, though, and there's no reason to expect that of them. By underwriting organizations like the Beck Center, they're ensuring rich educational opportunities.

The CAC funded over 50 of the 75 grants applied for in 2008. The judging criteria focusses more on things that can be quantified to some extent rather than purely on 'artistic merit', which I think we all agree is the most subjective parameter imaginable. Those that don't make the cut are likely failing in some critical aspect such as not serving a public audience or not being able to demonstrate matching funds from other sources.

If there are educational (non-school) programs out there that meet the basic criteria for application, I simply can't imagine that they wouldn't get funded.


Brian Pedaci
Posts: 496
Joined: Wed Nov 08, 2006 1:17 am

Postby Brian Pedaci » Mon Aug 18, 2008 1:06 am

Here's a good quote I just read which seemed appropriate for the discussion:

"In a country that has, at best, a conflicted relationship with public support for the arts, we are made to think more and more every year that art is a luxury. I was raised to believe it is a necessity. Art, in all its forms, is the expression of who, why, and where we are at any given time in history. It allows us to question, in a nonliteral, academic, or linear way, who we are, why we do what we do, and where we are going. Incorporating art into the fabric of everyday life is an obligation and a sign of a healthy democratic society." — Stanley Tucci


User avatar
Jim O'Bryan
Posts: 13383
Joined: Thu Mar 10, 2005 10:12 pm
Location: Lakewood
Contact:

Postby Jim O'Bryan » Tue Aug 19, 2008 7:27 am

Brian Pedaci wrote:
"In a country that has, at best, a conflicted relationship with public support for the arts, we are made to think more and more every year that art is a luxury. I was raised to believe it is a necessity. Art, in all its forms, is the expression of who, why, and where we are at any given time in history. It allows us to question, in a nonliteral, academic, or linear way, who we are, why we do what we do, and where we are going. Incorporating art into the fabric of everyday life is an obligation and a sign of a healthy democratic society." — Stanley Tucci



While a nice quote it should be noted that it comes from an artist, writer, director and damn fine actor.


FWIW


.


Jim O'Bryan
Lakewood Resident

"The very act of observing disturbs the system."
Werner Heisenberg

"If anything I've said seems useful to you, I'm glad.
If not, don't worry. Just forget about it."
His Holiness The Dalai Lama

Return to “Urban Dynamics”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests